C / C ++ Packaging for Python Using SWIG — Set 1

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There is no doubt that Numpy, executes a huge amount of tasks ? In fact, libraries like Numpy are not written entirely in Python, some parts of the library are written in C, which provides better performance. After writing the C code, we wrap them in Python code, which acts as an interface for those C codes. We can then call C functions using Python syntax, where the actual processing is done in C behind the scenes, and the result is returned back as a Python object. In this article, we will see how to create a Python wrapper for our C program on Linux systems using SWIG software.

What is SWIG

In a nutshell, SWIG — it is a compiler that accepts C / C++ declarations and wraps it up to access those declarations from other languages ‚Äã‚Äãlike Python, Tcl, Ruby, etc.
Usually this does not require any changes to existing code and creates an interface within a minute.

Reasons for creating a wrapper

In many cases we need wrappers, the following are —

  • Building an interpreted interface for existing C programs.
  • Building high-performance C modules for scripting languages ‚Äã‚Äã
  • Testing huge C programs is very difficult, so we write wrappers in some scripting languages ‚Äã‚Äãlike Python where it is very easy to write tests. etc

Installing SWIG

To download SWIG directly from the apt repository, enter the following commands —

 sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install swig 

Writing a Wrapper using SWIG

Let’s look at this piece of code at C with two functions and one global variable —

/ * file: gfg.c * /


# include & lt; stdio.h & gt;
# include & lt; math.h & gt;


// our header file
# include "gfg.h"
# define ll long long

double myvar = 3.4;


// calculate factorial

ll int fact (ll int n)

{

if (n & lt; = 1)

return 1;

else

return (n * fact (n-1));

}


// find the mod

int my_mod ( int n, int m )

{

return (n% m);

}

Here is our header file —

long long int fact ( long long int n);

int my_mod ( int n, int m);

First we have to create the SWIG interface file . This file contains prototypes of ANSI C functions and variable declarations. Here —

  • The % module directive specifies the name of the module we will use in Python.
  • % {. .% } provides a place to insert additional code, such as C header files or additional C declarations, into the generated wrapper code.
  • The % include directive allows us to include additional files such as header files.

/ * file: gfg.i * /


/ * name of the used module * /
% module gfg
% {

/ * Every thing in this file is copied into the

wrapper file. Include the C header file required

compile the interface * /

# include "gfg.h"

/ * variable declaration * /

double myvar;

%}


/ * explicitly list functions and variables for interaction * /

double myvar;

long long int fact ( long long int n1);

int my_mod ( int m, int n);


/ * or if we want to link all the functions, then we can just

include a header file like this -

% include & quot; gfg.h & quot;

* /

Now we will create the wrapper code using a command like

 $ swig -python gfg.i 

This command generates wrapper code named "gfg_wrap.c" . These files contain a bloated version of our C source with different error handling code, etc. Generated another file "gfg.py", which is the module we are importing into our python script.

After that we have to generate position-independent code to be used in the shared library by compiling "gfg_wrap.c" and "gfg.c" with the following command:

 $ gcc -c -fpic gfg_wrap.c gfg.c -I / use / include / python2.7 

Replace python2.7 with your Python version. This will create two object files
"Gfg_wrap.o‚" and "gfg.o‚" . In the above command —

  • generate position independent code (PIC) suitable for use in the shared library if supported for the target machine. This code accesses all permanent addresses through the Global Offset Table (GOT)

Note: if you receive an error message such as the following possible causes —

  • You may not have the & # 39; Python.h & # 39; or
  • You are entering the wrong location for the & # 39; Python.h & # 39; for the compiler

To get & # 39; Python.h & # 39; you have to install Python-dev, using the following command —

 $ sudo apt-get install python-dev 

To find the correct path to Python.h, run the following command —

 $ python-config --cflags 

This will output something like this —

Now replace the path in the compile command with this one for python2.7 or change the version to python3.5 for Python 3.5.

Now, finally, we have to link the generated object files together to create a shared object, which is similar to the DLL files on Windows. Use the following command, this will generate a shared object file "_gfg.so"

 $ gcc -shared gfg.o gfg_wrap.o -o _gfg.so 

We are now ready to test the Python shell by importing it. Make sure you are in the directory with this shell file.

 & gt; & gt; & gt; import gfg & gt; & gt; & gt; res = fact (5) & gt; & gt; & gt; res 120 & gt; & gt; & gt; res = my_mod (5,2) & gt; & gt; & gt; res 1 & gt; & gt; & gt; gfg.cvar.myvar 3.4 

Here C variables are available as.

Compiling and linking using distutils

Instead of typing commands and figuring out what compilation options are needed to compile files, we can automate this with distutils. Create as shown below —

# File: setup.py

from distutils.core import setup, Extension

# module name

name = "gfg"


# module version

version = "1.0"


# specify extension name and source files
# required for compilation

ext_modules = Extension (name = ’_gfg’ , sources = [ " gfg.i " , " gfg.c " ] )

setup (name = name,

version = version,

ext_modules = [ext_modules])

Now write the following commands to compile and install the module —

 $ python setup.py build_ext --inplace 

This should look like do something like this on the terminal —

Possible alternatives

Obviously, SWIG — not the only way to create wrappers, the following alternatives could be considered based on their requirements —

In the next article we will see how to wrapper C++ (OPP) code

Links

This article courtesy of Atul Kumar . If you are as Python.Engineering and would like to contribute, you can also write an article using contribute.python.engineering or by posting an article contribute @ python.engineering. See my article appearing on the Python.Engineering homepage and help other geeks.

Please post comments if you find anything wrong or if you’d like to share more information on the topic discussed above.

C / C ++ Packaging for Python Using SWIG — Set 1 _files: Questions

How do I list all files of a directory?

5 answers

How can I list all files of a directory in Python and add them to a list?

3467

Answer #1

os.listdir() will get you everything that"s in a directory - files and directories.

If you want just files, you could either filter this down using os.path:

from os import listdir
from os.path import isfile, join
onlyfiles = [f for f in listdir(mypath) if isfile(join(mypath, f))]

or you could use os.walk() which will yield two lists for each directory it visits - splitting into files and dirs for you. If you only want the top directory you can break the first time it yields

from os import walk

f = []
for (dirpath, dirnames, filenames) in walk(mypath):
    f.extend(filenames)
    break

or, shorter:

from os import walk

filenames = next(walk(mypath), (None, None, []))[2]  # [] if no file

3467

Answer #2

I prefer using the glob module, as it does pattern matching and expansion.

import glob
print(glob.glob("/home/adam/*"))

It does pattern matching intuitively

import glob
# All files ending with .txt
print(glob.glob("/home/adam/*.txt")) 
# All files ending with .txt with depth of 2 folder
print(glob.glob("/home/adam/*/*.txt")) 

It will return a list with the queried files:

["/home/adam/file1.txt", "/home/adam/file2.txt", .... ]

3467

Answer #3

os.listdir() - list in the current directory

With listdir in os module you get the files and the folders in the current dir

 import os
 arr = os.listdir()
 print(arr)
 
 >>> ["$RECYCLE.BIN", "work.txt", "3ebooks.txt", "documents"]

Looking in a directory

arr = os.listdir("c:\files")

glob from glob

with glob you can specify a type of file to list like this

import glob

txtfiles = []
for file in glob.glob("*.txt"):
    txtfiles.append(file)

glob in a list comprehension

mylist = [f for f in glob.glob("*.txt")]

get the full path of only files in the current directory

import os
from os import listdir
from os.path import isfile, join

cwd = os.getcwd()
onlyfiles = [os.path.join(cwd, f) for f in os.listdir(cwd) if 
os.path.isfile(os.path.join(cwd, f))]
print(onlyfiles) 

["G:\getfilesname\getfilesname.py", "G:\getfilesname\example.txt"]

Getting the full path name with os.path.abspath

You get the full path in return

 import os
 files_path = [os.path.abspath(x) for x in os.listdir()]
 print(files_path)
 
 ["F:\documentiapplications.txt", "F:\documenticollections.txt"]

Walk: going through sub directories

os.walk returns the root, the directories list and the files list, that is why I unpacked them in r, d, f in the for loop; it, then, looks for other files and directories in the subfolders of the root and so on until there are no subfolders.

import os

# Getting the current work directory (cwd)
thisdir = os.getcwd()

# r=root, d=directories, f = files
for r, d, f in os.walk(thisdir):
    for file in f:
        if file.endswith(".docx"):
            print(os.path.join(r, file))

os.listdir(): get files in the current directory (Python 2)

In Python 2, if you want the list of the files in the current directory, you have to give the argument as "." or os.getcwd() in the os.listdir method.

 import os
 arr = os.listdir(".")
 print(arr)
 
 >>> ["$RECYCLE.BIN", "work.txt", "3ebooks.txt", "documents"]

To go up in the directory tree

# Method 1
x = os.listdir("..")

# Method 2
x= os.listdir("/")

Get files: os.listdir() in a particular directory (Python 2 and 3)

 import os
 arr = os.listdir("F:\python")
 print(arr)
 
 >>> ["$RECYCLE.BIN", "work.txt", "3ebooks.txt", "documents"]

Get files of a particular subdirectory with os.listdir()

import os

x = os.listdir("./content")

os.walk(".") - current directory

 import os
 arr = next(os.walk("."))[2]
 print(arr)
 
 >>> ["5bs_Turismo1.pdf", "5bs_Turismo1.pptx", "esperienza.txt"]

next(os.walk(".")) and os.path.join("dir", "file")

 import os
 arr = []
 for d,r,f in next(os.walk("F:\_python")):
     for file in f:
         arr.append(os.path.join(r,file))

 for f in arr:
     print(files)

>>> F:\_python\dict_class.py
>>> F:\_python\programmi.txt

next(os.walk("F:\") - get the full path - list comprehension

 [os.path.join(r,file) for r,d,f in next(os.walk("F:\_python")) for file in f]
 
 >>> ["F:\_python\dict_class.py", "F:\_python\programmi.txt"]

os.walk - get full path - all files in sub dirs**

x = [os.path.join(r,file) for r,d,f in os.walk("F:\_python") for file in f]
print(x)

>>> ["F:\_python\dict.py", "F:\_python\progr.txt", "F:\_python\readl.py"]

os.listdir() - get only txt files

 arr_txt = [x for x in os.listdir() if x.endswith(".txt")]
 print(arr_txt)
 
 >>> ["work.txt", "3ebooks.txt"]

Using glob to get the full path of the files

If I should need the absolute path of the files:

from path import path
from glob import glob
x = [path(f).abspath() for f in glob("F:\*.txt")]
for f in x:
    print(f)

>>> F:acquistionline.txt
>>> F:acquisti_2018.txt
>>> F:ootstrap_jquery_ecc.txt

Using os.path.isfile to avoid directories in the list

import os.path
listOfFiles = [f for f in os.listdir() if os.path.isfile(f)]
print(listOfFiles)

>>> ["a simple game.py", "data.txt", "decorator.py"]

Using pathlib from Python 3.4

import pathlib

flist = []
for p in pathlib.Path(".").iterdir():
    if p.is_file():
        print(p)
        flist.append(p)

 >>> error.PNG
 >>> exemaker.bat
 >>> guiprova.mp3
 >>> setup.py
 >>> speak_gui2.py
 >>> thumb.PNG

With list comprehension:

flist = [p for p in pathlib.Path(".").iterdir() if p.is_file()]

Alternatively, use pathlib.Path() instead of pathlib.Path(".")

Use glob method in pathlib.Path()

import pathlib

py = pathlib.Path().glob("*.py")
for file in py:
    print(file)

>>> stack_overflow_list.py
>>> stack_overflow_list_tkinter.py

Get all and only files with os.walk

import os
x = [i[2] for i in os.walk(".")]
y=[]
for t in x:
    for f in t:
        y.append(f)
print(y)

>>> ["append_to_list.py", "data.txt", "data1.txt", "data2.txt", "data_180617", "os_walk.py", "READ2.py", "read_data.py", "somma_defaltdic.py", "substitute_words.py", "sum_data.py", "data.txt", "data1.txt", "data_180617"]

Get only files with next and walk in a directory

 import os
 x = next(os.walk("F://python"))[2]
 print(x)
 
 >>> ["calculator.bat","calculator.py"]

Get only directories with next and walk in a directory

 import os
 next(os.walk("F://python"))[1] # for the current dir use (".")
 
 >>> ["python3","others"]

Get all the subdir names with walk

for r,d,f in os.walk("F:\_python"):
    for dirs in d:
        print(dirs)

>>> .vscode
>>> pyexcel
>>> pyschool.py
>>> subtitles
>>> _metaprogramming
>>> .ipynb_checkpoints

os.scandir() from Python 3.5 and greater

import os
x = [f.name for f in os.scandir() if f.is_file()]
print(x)

>>> ["calculator.bat","calculator.py"]

# Another example with scandir (a little variation from docs.python.org)
# This one is more efficient than os.listdir.
# In this case, it shows the files only in the current directory
# where the script is executed.

import os
with os.scandir() as i:
    for entry in i:
        if entry.is_file():
            print(entry.name)

>>> ebookmaker.py
>>> error.PNG
>>> exemaker.bat
>>> guiprova.mp3
>>> setup.py
>>> speakgui4.py
>>> speak_gui2.py
>>> speak_gui3.py
>>> thumb.PNG

Examples:

Ex. 1: How many files are there in the subdirectories?

In this example, we look for the number of files that are included in all the directory and its subdirectories.

import os

def count(dir, counter=0):
    "returns number of files in dir and subdirs"
    for pack in os.walk(dir):
        for f in pack[2]:
            counter += 1
    return dir + " : " + str(counter) + "files"

print(count("F:\python"))

>>> "F:\python" : 12057 files"

Ex.2: How to copy all files from a directory to another?

A script to make order in your computer finding all files of a type (default: pptx) and copying them in a new folder.

import os
import shutil
from path import path

destination = "F:\file_copied"
# os.makedirs(destination)

def copyfile(dir, filetype="pptx", counter=0):
    "Searches for pptx (or other - pptx is the default) files and copies them"
    for pack in os.walk(dir):
        for f in pack[2]:
            if f.endswith(filetype):
                fullpath = pack[0] + "\" + f
                print(fullpath)
                shutil.copy(fullpath, destination)
                counter += 1
    if counter > 0:
        print("-" * 30)
        print("	==> Found in: `" + dir + "` : " + str(counter) + " files
")

for dir in os.listdir():
    "searches for folders that starts with `_`"
    if dir[0] == "_":
        # copyfile(dir, filetype="pdf")
        copyfile(dir, filetype="txt")


>>> _compiti18Compito Contabilità 1conti.txt
>>> _compiti18Compito Contabilità 1modula4.txt
>>> _compiti18Compito Contabilità 1moduloa4.txt
>>> ------------------------
>>> ==> Found in: `_compiti18` : 3 files

Ex. 3: How to get all the files in a txt file

In case you want to create a txt file with all the file names:

import os
mylist = ""
with open("filelist.txt", "w", encoding="utf-8") as file:
    for eachfile in os.listdir():
        mylist += eachfile + "
"
    file.write(mylist)

Example: txt with all the files of an hard drive

"""
We are going to save a txt file with all the files in your directory.
We will use the function walk()
"""

import os

# see all the methods of os
# print(*dir(os), sep=", ")
listafile = []
percorso = []
with open("lista_file.txt", "w", encoding="utf-8") as testo:
    for root, dirs, files in os.walk("D:\"):
        for file in files:
            listafile.append(file)
            percorso.append(root + "\" + file)
            testo.write(file + "
")
listafile.sort()
print("N. of files", len(listafile))
with open("lista_file_ordinata.txt", "w", encoding="utf-8") as testo_ordinato:
    for file in listafile:
        testo_ordinato.write(file + "
")

with open("percorso.txt", "w", encoding="utf-8") as file_percorso:
    for file in percorso:
        file_percorso.write(file + "
")

os.system("lista_file.txt")
os.system("lista_file_ordinata.txt")
os.system("percorso.txt")

All the file of C: in one text file

This is a shorter version of the previous code. Change the folder where to start finding the files if you need to start from another position. This code generate a 50 mb on text file on my computer with something less then 500.000 lines with files with the complete path.

import os

with open("file.txt", "w", encoding="utf-8") as filewrite:
    for r, d, f in os.walk("C:\"):
        for file in f:
            filewrite.write(f"{r + file}
")

How to write a file with all paths in a folder of a type

With this function you can create a txt file that will have the name of a type of file that you look for (ex. pngfile.txt) with all the full path of all the files of that type. It can be useful sometimes, I think.

import os

def searchfiles(extension=".ttf", folder="H:\"):
    "Create a txt file with all the file of a type"
    with open(extension[1:] + "file.txt", "w", encoding="utf-8") as filewrite:
        for r, d, f in os.walk(folder):
            for file in f:
                if file.endswith(extension):
                    filewrite.write(f"{r + file}
")

# looking for png file (fonts) in the hard disk H:
searchfiles(".png", "H:\")

>>> H:4bs_18Dolphins5.png
>>> H:4bs_18Dolphins6.png
>>> H:4bs_18Dolphins7.png
>>> H:5_18marketing htmlassetsimageslogo2.png
>>> H:7z001.png
>>> H:7z002.png

(New) Find all files and open them with tkinter GUI

I just wanted to add in this 2019 a little app to search for all files in a dir and be able to open them by doubleclicking on the name of the file in the list. enter image description here

import tkinter as tk
import os

def searchfiles(extension=".txt", folder="H:\"):
    "insert all files in the listbox"
    for r, d, f in os.walk(folder):
        for file in f:
            if file.endswith(extension):
                lb.insert(0, r + "\" + file)

def open_file():
    os.startfile(lb.get(lb.curselection()[0]))

root = tk.Tk()
root.geometry("400x400")
bt = tk.Button(root, text="Search", command=lambda:searchfiles(".png", "H:\"))
bt.pack()
lb = tk.Listbox(root)
lb.pack(fill="both", expand=1)
lb.bind("<Double-Button>", lambda x: open_file())
root.mainloop()

C / C ++ Packaging for Python Using SWIG — Set 1 cos: Questions

cos

How do I install pip on macOS or OS X?

5 answers

I spent most of the day yesterday searching for a clear answer for installing pip (package manager for Python). I can"t find a good solution.

How do I install it?

1672

Answer #1

UPDATE (Jan 2019):

easy_install has been deprecated. Please use get-pip.py instead.


Old answer:

easy_install pip

If you need admin privileges to run this, try:

sudo easy_install pip

1672

Answer #2

⚡️ TL;DR — One line solution.

All you have to do is:

sudo easy_install pip

2019: ⚠️easy_install has been deprecated. Check Method #2 below for preferred installation!

Details:

⚡️ OK, I read the solutions given above, but here"s an EASY solution to install pip.

MacOS comes with Python installed. But to make sure that you have Python installed open the terminal and run the following command.

python --version

If this command returns a version number that means Python exists. Which also means that you already have access to easy_install considering you are using macOS/OSX.

ℹ️ Now, all you have to do is run the following command.

sudo easy_install pip

After that, pip will be installed and you"ll be able to use it for installing other packages.

Let me know if you have any problems installing pip this way.

Cheers!

P.S. I ended up blogging a post about it. QuickTip: How Do I Install pip on macOS or OS X?


✅ UPDATE (Jan 2019): METHOD #2: Two line solution —

easy_install has been deprecated. Please use get-pip.py instead.

First of all download the get-pip file

curl https://bootstrap.pypa.io/get-pip.py -o get-pip.py

Now run this file to install pip

python get-pip.py

That should do it.

Another gif you said? Here ya go!

1672

Answer #3

You can install it through Homebrew on OS X. Why would you install Python with Homebrew?

The version of Python that ships with OS X is great for learning but it’s not good for development. The version shipped with OS X may be out of date from the official current Python release, which is considered the stable production version. (source)

Homebrew is something of a package manager for OS X. Find more details on the Homebrew page. Once Homebrew is installed, run the following to install the latest Python, Pip & Setuptools:

brew install python

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