Python | Reverse tuple

Python Methods and Functions

Since we know that in Python, tuples are immutable, so they cannot be changed or changed. This provides us with limited ways to access a tuple as opposed to a list. We will cover several techniques on how you can modify a tuple in python. 
Examples:

 Input: tuples = ('z',' a', 'd',' f', 'g',' e', 'e',' k') Output: ('k',' e', 'e',' g', 'f',' d', 'a',' z') Input: tuples = (10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15) Output: (15, 14, 13, 12, 11, 10) 

Method 1: Using slicing technique.
This method creates a copy of the tuple, and the tuple is not sorted in place. Since tuples are immutable, there is no way to reverse a tuple in-place. Making a copy requires more storage space for all existing items. So this is running out of memory.

# Inverting a tuple using the slicing technique
# New tuple created

def Reverse (tuples):

new_tup = tuples [:: - 1 ]

return new_tup

  
Driver code

tuples = ( 'z' , 'a' , 'd' , 'f' , ' g' , 'e' , ' e' , 'k' )

print (Reverse (tuples))

Output:

 ('k',' e', 'e',' g', 'f',' d', 'a',' z') 

Method 2. Using the built-in reversed () function.
In this method, we do not make a single copy of the tuple. Instead, we get a reverse iterator, which we use to loop through the tuple, similar to a list.

# Flip the list with reversed ()

def Reverse (tuples):

new_tup = ()

for k in reversed (tuples):

new_tup = new_tup + (k,)

  print new_tup

 
Driver code

tuples = ( 10 , 11 , 12 , 13 , 14 , 15 )

Reverse (tuples)

Output:

 (15, 14, 13, 12, 11, 10) 




Tutorials