Python Calendar Module | yeardatescalendar () method

Python Methods and Functions

yeardatescalendar() is used in Python to get a list of weeks in a month of the year as full weeks. Entries in week lists are day numbers. Day numbers outside this month are zero.

  Syntax:  yeardatescalendar (year, width)  Parameter:   year:  year of the calendar  width:   [Default: 3]  number of months in each row.  Returns:  a list of month rows. 

Code # 1:

# Python program for demonstration work
# yeardatescalendar () method

 
# import calendar module

import calendar

 

obj = calendar.Calendar ()

  

year = 2016

# default width is 3

 
# print with yeardates calendar

print (obj.yeardatescalendar (year))

Exit:

[[ [[datetime.date (2018, 1, 1), datetime.date (2018, 1, 2), datetime.date (2018, 1, 3), datetime.date (2018, 1, 4), datetime.date ( 2018, 1, 5), datetime.date (2018, 1, 6), datetime.date (2018, 1, 7)], [datetime.date (2018, 1, 8), datetime.date (2018, 1, 9), datetime.date (2018, 1, 10), datetime.date (2018, 1, 11), datetime.date (2018, 1, 12), datetime.date (2018, 1, 13), datetime.date (2018, 1, 14)], [datetime.date (2018, 1, 15), datetime.date (2018, 1, 16), datetime.date (2018, 1, 17), datetime.date (2018, 1 , 18), datetime.date (2018, 1, 19), datetime.date (2018, 1, 20), datetime.date (2018, 1, 21)], [datetime.date (2018, 1, 22), datetime.date (2018, 1, 23), datetime.date (2018, 1, 24), datetime.date (2018, 1, 25), datetime.date (2018, 1, 26), datetime.date (2018, 1, 27), datetime.date (2018, 1, 28)],
. ... ... ... .
[datetime.date (2018, 12, 17), datetime.date (2018, 12, 18), datetime.date (2018, 12, 19), datetime.date (2018, 12, 20), datetime.date (2018, 12, 21), datetime.date (2018, 12, 22), datetime.date (2018, 12, 23)], [datetime.date (2018, 12, 24), datetime.date ( 2018, 12, 25), datetime.date (2018, 12, 26), datetime.date (2018, 12, 27), datetime.date (2018, 12, 28), datetime.date (2018, 12, 29) , datetime.date (2018, 12, 30)], [datetime.date (2018, 12, 31), datetime.date (2019, 1, 1), datetime.date (2019, 1, 2), datetime.date (2019, 1, 3), datetime.date (2019, 1, 4), datetime.date (2019, 1, 5), datetime.date (2019, 1, 6)]]]]

Note that the weeks in the output are lists of seven datetime.date objects.

Code # 2: repeating a list of weeks

# Python demo program
# of the yeardatescalendar () method

  
# import of the calendar module

import calendar

  

obj = calendar.Calendar ( )

 
# iteratign with yeardatescalendar

for day in obj .yeardatescalendar ( 2018 , 1 ):

print (day)

Output:

[[[datetime.d ate (2018, 1, 1), datetime.date (2018, 1, 2), datetime.date (2018, 1, 3), datetime.date (2018, 1, 4). ... ... datetime.date (2018, 1, 31), datetime.date (2018, 2, 1), datetime.date (2018, 2, 2), datetime.date (2018, 2, 3), datetime.date (2018, 2, 4)]]]
. ... ... .
[[[datetime.date (2018, 11, 26), datetime.date (2018, 11, 27), datetime.date (2018, 11, 28), datetime.date (2018, 11, 29 ), datetime.date (2018, 11, 30), datetime.date (2018, 12, 1), datetime.date (2018, 12, 2)], [datetime.date (2018, 12, 3). ... .datetime.date (2018, 12, 29), datetime.date (2018, 12, 30)], [datetime.date (2018, 12, 31), datetime.date (2019, 1, 1), datetime.date (2019, 1, 2), datetime.date (2019, 1, 3), datetime.date (2019, 1, 4), datetime.date (2019, 1, 5), datetime.date (2019, 1, 6 )]]]





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