Sleep Javascript

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If you are an engineer or developer of different programming languages, you may have used a native method called sleep () to block or suspend an operating method. JavaScript does not have a native method.

In this article, we are going to talk about two different ways we can use JavaScript to simulate a suspend function: Promise functions and Asynchronous / wait functions. method

Introduction to Asynchronous Functions

We shouldn’t talk about promises or async / functions waiting for you in JavaScript without first briefly mentioning the setTimeout () . This method will show why promises are needed in JavaScript.

JavaScript is single-threaded

When we say that JavaScript is a single-threaded language, what we mean is JavaScript it only has one call stack and one heap. At a high level, this mean s that the JavaScript code reads as follows, one line at a time, in order, and must execute a piece of code before moving on to the next line. This makes JavaScript synchronous by nature. Sometimes we need a solution to make our code asynchronous.

synchronous code vs asynchronous code

See this example.

Pretty simple, right? Each of the console.logs will be printed successively because JavaScript is executing them successively.

The word Let we want line two to be printed before line three? How can you basically print that console.log in turn? We can do this with setTimeout ():

setTimeout () allows us to execute a JavaScript function without blocking the thread so any other code can be achieved. The first argument is the callback function which is executed after a certain amount of time (the second argument). The second argument is represented in a number of milliseconds

>

setTimeout () method mimics the native sleep method in other languages:

  1. Setting a timer the background when the javascript engine executes the setTimeout ()
  2. Continue to execute any other code while the timer is counting down
  3. run the callback function in setTimeout () when the running of timer zero.

Understanding how setTimeout () works is essential to be able to understand as promises and async / wait for functions to work. We’ll cover the promises later.

Promises

Creating a Promise

Promises are a way of executing asynchronous logic. The Promise constructor accepts a callback function that has two parameters: Determine and Reject This callback function contains logic that, when finished, will invoke a new one. Solve or reject the function with a past response

The snippet code here demonstrates a simple promise. Promises can be in three states:

pending - Neither resolved nor rejected - this is the initial state of the promise

resolved - successful execution

rejected - runtime error

Try changing the resolveFlag object in the code snippet shown here - above to demonstrate the resolution of a resolved promise and a rejected promise.

The main thing to remember is that this promise contains a function that stops the execution of the script until the promise is resolved or rejected. Then the script resumes

Usage of a Promise response

When we launch a Promise instance, we use then () and catch () to define the logic we want to use after receiving a response from the Promise of Return This is structured as a single statement - a high level overview look like:.

promise.then (Func). catch (func);

In parentheses which invokes the methods and then taken is an anonymous function which has the response passed in parameter

Promises are often used when calling a database or making an HTTP request.

Asynchronous / Attendent functions

The last way we can simulate the sleep method () is to use the async functions / are waiting for you. Essentially, these asynchronous functions are another way of building the same logic that we would use in promises, but with less code.

the term async is placed before the key in the office before SS6 and before parameters in SS6 + functions. Any logical that v We want to do this before going into this block of code.

Using ASYNC / results in wait functions pretty much the same async process based on promises, but with less code .

Conclusion

In this article, we have looked at ways to mimic Functions sleep () which originated from other programming languages ‚Äã‚ÄãWe used setTimeout () to demonstrate the concept of asynchronous JavaScript functions so that we can examine the promises and async / functions await you .

Sleep Javascript find: Questions

Finding the index of an item in a list

5 answers

Given a list ["foo", "bar", "baz"] and an item in the list "bar", how do I get its index (1) in Python?

3740

Answer #1

>>> ["foo", "bar", "baz"].index("bar")
1

Reference: Data Structures > More on Lists

Caveats follow

Note that while this is perhaps the cleanest way to answer the question as asked, index is a rather weak component of the list API, and I can"t remember the last time I used it in anger. It"s been pointed out to me in the comments that because this answer is heavily referenced, it should be made more complete. Some caveats about list.index follow. It is probably worth initially taking a look at the documentation for it:

list.index(x[, start[, end]])

Return zero-based index in the list of the first item whose value is equal to x. Raises a ValueError if there is no such item.

The optional arguments start and end are interpreted as in the slice notation and are used to limit the search to a particular subsequence of the list. The returned index is computed relative to the beginning of the full sequence rather than the start argument.

Linear time-complexity in list length

An index call checks every element of the list in order, until it finds a match. If your list is long, and you don"t know roughly where in the list it occurs, this search could become a bottleneck. In that case, you should consider a different data structure. Note that if you know roughly where to find the match, you can give index a hint. For instance, in this snippet, l.index(999_999, 999_990, 1_000_000) is roughly five orders of magnitude faster than straight l.index(999_999), because the former only has to search 10 entries, while the latter searches a million:

>>> import timeit
>>> timeit.timeit("l.index(999_999)", setup="l = list(range(0, 1_000_000))", number=1000)
9.356267921015387
>>> timeit.timeit("l.index(999_999, 999_990, 1_000_000)", setup="l = list(range(0, 1_000_000))", number=1000)
0.0004404920036904514
 

Only returns the index of the first match to its argument

A call to index searches through the list in order until it finds a match, and stops there. If you expect to need indices of more matches, you should use a list comprehension, or generator expression.

>>> [1, 1].index(1)
0
>>> [i for i, e in enumerate([1, 2, 1]) if e == 1]
[0, 2]
>>> g = (i for i, e in enumerate([1, 2, 1]) if e == 1)
>>> next(g)
0
>>> next(g)
2

Most places where I once would have used index, I now use a list comprehension or generator expression because they"re more generalizable. So if you"re considering reaching for index, take a look at these excellent Python features.

Throws if element not present in list

A call to index results in a ValueError if the item"s not present.

>>> [1, 1].index(2)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: 2 is not in list

If the item might not be present in the list, you should either

  1. Check for it first with item in my_list (clean, readable approach), or
  2. Wrap the index call in a try/except block which catches ValueError (probably faster, at least when the list to search is long, and the item is usually present.)

3740

Answer #2

One thing that is really helpful in learning Python is to use the interactive help function:

>>> help(["foo", "bar", "baz"])
Help on list object:

class list(object)
 ...

 |
 |  index(...)
 |      L.index(value, [start, [stop]]) -> integer -- return first index of value
 |

which will often lead you to the method you are looking for.

3740

Answer #3

The majority of answers explain how to find a single index, but their methods do not return multiple indexes if the item is in the list multiple times. Use enumerate():

for i, j in enumerate(["foo", "bar", "baz"]):
    if j == "bar":
        print(i)

The index() function only returns the first occurrence, while enumerate() returns all occurrences.

As a list comprehension:

[i for i, j in enumerate(["foo", "bar", "baz"]) if j == "bar"]

Here"s also another small solution with itertools.count() (which is pretty much the same approach as enumerate):

from itertools import izip as zip, count # izip for maximum efficiency
[i for i, j in zip(count(), ["foo", "bar", "baz"]) if j == "bar"]

This is more efficient for larger lists than using enumerate():

$ python -m timeit -s "from itertools import izip as zip, count" "[i for i, j in zip(count(), ["foo", "bar", "baz"]*500) if j == "bar"]"
10000 loops, best of 3: 174 usec per loop
$ python -m timeit "[i for i, j in enumerate(["foo", "bar", "baz"]*500) if j == "bar"]"
10000 loops, best of 3: 196 usec per loop

Sleep Javascript JavaScript: Questions

JSON datetime between Python and JavaScript

4 answers

kevin By kevin

I want to send a datetime.datetime object in serialized form from Python using JSON and de-serialize in JavaScript using JSON. What is the best way to do this?

403

Answer #1

You can add the "default" parameter to json.dumps to handle this:

date_handler = lambda obj: (
    obj.isoformat()
    if isinstance(obj, (datetime.datetime, datetime.date))
    else None
)
json.dumps(datetime.datetime.now(), default=date_handler)
""2010-04-20T20:08:21.634121""

Which is ISO 8601 format.

A more comprehensive default handler function:

def handler(obj):
    if hasattr(obj, "isoformat"):
        return obj.isoformat()
    elif isinstance(obj, ...):
        return ...
    else:
        raise TypeError, "Object of type %s with value of %s is not JSON serializable" % (type(obj), repr(obj))

Update: Added output of type as well as value.
Update: Also handle date

What blocks Ruby, Python to get Javascript V8 speed?

4 answers

Are there any Ruby / Python features that are blocking implementation of optimizations (e.g. inline caching) V8 engine has?

Python is co-developed by Google guys so it shouldn"t be blocked by software patents.

Or this is rather matter of resources put into the V8 project by Google.

260

Answer #1

What blocks Ruby, Python to get Javascript V8 speed?

Nothing.

Well, okay: money. (And time, people, resources, but if you have money, you can buy those.)

V8 has a team of brilliant, highly-specialized, highly-experienced (and thus highly-paid) engineers working on it, that have decades of experience (I"m talking individually – collectively it"s more like centuries) in creating high-performance execution engines for dynamic OO languages. They are basically the same people who also created the Sun HotSpot JVM (among many others).

Lars Bak, the lead developer, has been literally working on VMs for 25 years (and all of those VMs have lead up to V8), which is basically his entire (professional) life. Some of the people writing Ruby VMs aren"t even 25 years old.

Are there any Ruby / Python features that are blocking implementation of optimizations (e.g. inline caching) V8 engine has?

Given that at least IronRuby, JRuby, MagLev, MacRuby and Rubinius have either monomorphic (IronRuby) or polymorphic inline caching, the answer is obviously no.

Modern Ruby implementations already do a great deal of optimizations. For example, for certain operations, Rubinius"s Hash class is faster than YARV"s. Now, this doesn"t sound terribly exciting until you realize that Rubinius"s Hash class is implemented in 100% pure Ruby, while YARV"s is implemented in 100% hand-optimized C.

So, at least in some cases, Rubinius can generate better code than GCC!

Or this is rather matter of resources put into the V8 project by Google.

Yes. Not just Google. The lineage of V8"s source code is 25 years old now. The people who are working on V8 also created the Self VM (to this day one of the fastest dynamic OO language execution engines ever created), the Animorphic Smalltalk VM (to this day one of the fastest Smalltalk execution engines ever created), the HotSpot JVM (the fastest JVM ever created, probably the fastest VM period) and OOVM (one of the most efficient Smalltalk VMs ever created).

In fact, Lars Bak, the lead developer of V8, worked on every single one of those, plus a few others.

Django Template Variables and Javascript

4 answers

When I render a page using the Django template renderer, I can pass in a dictionary variable containing various values to manipulate them in the page using {{ myVar }}.

Is there a way to access the same variable in Javascript (perhaps using the DOM, I don"t know how Django makes the variables accessible)? I want to be able to lookup details using an AJAX lookup based on the values contained in the variables passed in.

256

Answer #1

The {{variable}} is substituted directly into the HTML. Do a view source; it isn"t a "variable" or anything like it. It"s just rendered text.

Having said that, you can put this kind of substitution into your JavaScript.

<script type="text/javascript"> 
   var a = "{{someDjangoVariable}}";
</script>

This gives you "dynamic" javascript.

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