How to write to a CSV line by line?

| |

👻 Check our latest review to choose the best laptop for Machine Learning engineers and Deep learning tasks!

I have data which is being accessed via http request and is sent back by the server in a comma separated format, I have the following code :

site= "www.example.com"
hdr = {"User-Agent": "Mozilla/5.0"}
req = urllib2.Request(site,headers=hdr)
page = urllib2.urlopen(req)
soup = BeautifulSoup(page)
soup = soup.get_text()
text=str(soup)

The content of text is as follows:

april,2,5,7
may,3,5,8
june,4,7,3
july,5,6,9

How can I save this data into a CSV file. I know I can do something along the lines of the following to iterate line by line:

import StringIO
s = StringIO.StringIO(text)
for line in s:

But i"m unsure how to now properly write each line to CSV

EDIT---> Thanks for the feedback as suggested the solution was rather simple and can be seen below.

Solution:

import StringIO
s = StringIO.StringIO(text)
with open("fileName.csv", "w") as f:
    for line in s:
        f.write(line)

👻 Read also: what is the best laptop for engineering students?

How to write to a CSV line by line? open: Questions

How can I open multiple files using "with open" in Python?

5 answers

I want to change a couple of files at one time, iff I can write to all of them. I"m wondering if I somehow can combine the multiple open calls with the with statement:

try:
  with open("a", "w") as a and open("b", "w") as b:
    do_something()
except IOError as e:
  print "Operation failed: %s" % e.strerror

If that"s not possible, what would an elegant solution to this problem look like?

788

Answer #1

As of Python 2.7 (or 3.1 respectively) you can write

with open("a", "w") as a, open("b", "w") as b:
    do_something()

In earlier versions of Python, you can sometimes use contextlib.nested() to nest context managers. This won"t work as expected for opening multiples files, though -- see the linked documentation for details.


In the rare case that you want to open a variable number of files all at the same time, you can use contextlib.ExitStack, starting from Python version 3.3:

with ExitStack() as stack:
    files = [stack.enter_context(open(fname)) for fname in filenames]
    # Do something with "files"

Most of the time you have a variable set of files, you likely want to open them one after the other, though.

How to write to a CSV line by line? open: Questions

open() in Python does not create a file if it doesn"t exist

5 answers

What is the best way to open a file as read/write if it exists, or if it does not, then create it and open it as read/write? From what I read, file = open("myfile.dat", "rw") should do this, right?

It is not working for me (Python 2.6.2) and I"m wondering if it is a version problem, or not supposed to work like that or what.

The bottom line is, I just need a solution for the problem. I am curious about the other stuff, but all I need is a nice way to do the opening part.

The enclosing directory was writeable by user and group, not other (I"m on a Linux system... so permissions 775 in other words), and the exact error was:

IOError: no such file or directory.

778

Answer #1

You should use open with the w+ mode:

file = open("myfile.dat", "w+")

How to write to a CSV line by line? open: Questions

Difference between modes a, a+, w, w+, and r+ in built-in open function?

5 answers

In the python built-in open function, what is the exact difference between the modes w, a, w+, a+, and r+?

In particular, the documentation implies that all of these will allow writing to the file, and says that it opens the files for "appending", "writing", and "updating" specifically, but does not define what these terms mean.

721

Answer #1

The opening modes are exactly the same as those for the C standard library function fopen().

The BSD fopen manpage defines them as follows:

 The argument mode points to a string beginning with one of the following
 sequences (Additional characters may follow these sequences.):

 ``r""   Open text file for reading.  The stream is positioned at the
         beginning of the file.

 ``r+""  Open for reading and writing.  The stream is positioned at the
         beginning of the file.

 ``w""   Truncate file to zero length or create text file for writing.
         The stream is positioned at the beginning of the file.

 ``w+""  Open for reading and writing.  The file is created if it does not
         exist, otherwise it is truncated.  The stream is positioned at
         the beginning of the file.

 ``a""   Open for writing.  The file is created if it does not exist.  The
         stream is positioned at the end of the file.  Subsequent writes
         to the file will always end up at the then current end of file,
         irrespective of any intervening fseek(3) or similar.

 ``a+""  Open for reading and writing.  The file is created if it does not
         exist.  The stream is positioned at the end of the file.  Subse-
         quent writes to the file will always end up at the then current
         end of file, irrespective of any intervening fseek(3) or similar.

sep

How to print number with commas as thousands separators?

5 answers

I am trying to print an integer in Python 2.6.1 with commas as thousands separators. For example, I want to show the number 1234567 as 1,234,567. How would I go about doing this? I have seen many examples on Google, but I am looking for the simplest practical way.

It does not need to be locale-specific to decide between periods and commas. I would prefer something as simple as reasonably possible.

929

Answer #1

Locale unaware

"{:,}".format(value)  # For Python ‚â•2.7
f"{value:,}"  # For Python ‚â•3.6

Locale aware

import locale
locale.setlocale(locale.LC_ALL, "")  # Use "" for auto, or force e.g. to "en_US.UTF-8"

"{:n}".format(value)  # For Python ‚â•2.7
f"{value:n}"  # For Python ‚â•3.6

Reference

Per Format Specification Mini-Language,

The "," option signals the use of a comma for a thousands separator. For a locale aware separator, use the "n" integer presentation type instead.

929

Answer #2

I got this to work:

>>> import locale
>>> locale.setlocale(locale.LC_ALL, "en_US")
"en_US"
>>> locale.format("%d", 1255000, grouping=True)
"1,255,000"

Sure, you don"t need internationalization support, but it"s clear, concise, and uses a built-in library.

P.S. That "%d" is the usual %-style formatter. You can have only one formatter, but it can be whatever you need in terms of field width and precision settings.

P.P.S. If you can"t get locale to work, I"d suggest a modified version of Mark"s answer:

def intWithCommas(x):
    if type(x) not in [type(0), type(0L)]:
        raise TypeError("Parameter must be an integer.")
    if x < 0:
        return "-" + intWithCommas(-x)
    result = ""
    while x >= 1000:
        x, r = divmod(x, 1000)
        result = ",%03d%s" % (r, result)
    return "%d%s" % (x, result)

Recursion is useful for the negative case, but one recursion per comma seems a bit excessive to me.

sep

How would you make a comma-separated string from a list of strings?

5 answers

mweerden By mweerden

What would be your preferred way to concatenate strings from a sequence such that between every two consecutive pairs a comma is added. That is, how do you map, for instance, ["a", "b", "c"] to "a,b,c"? (The cases ["s"] and [] should be mapped to "s" and "", respectively.)

I usually end up using something like "".join(map(lambda x: x+",",l))[:-1], but also feeling somewhat unsatisfied.

612

Answer #1

my_list = ["a", "b", "c", "d"]
my_string = ",".join(my_list)
"a,b,c,d"

This won"t work if the list contains integers


And if the list contains non-string types (such as integers, floats, bools, None) then do:

my_string = ",".join(map(str, my_list)) 

Shop

Learn programming in R: courses

$

Best Python online courses for 2022

$

Best laptop for Fortnite

$

Best laptop for Excel

$

Best laptop for Solidworks

$

Best laptop for Roblox

$

Best computer for crypto mining

$

Best laptop for Sims 4

$

Latest questions

NUMPYNUMPY

psycopg2: insert multiple rows with one query

12 answers

NUMPYNUMPY

How to convert Nonetype to int or string?

12 answers

NUMPYNUMPY

How to specify multiple return types using type-hints

12 answers

NUMPYNUMPY

Javascript Error: IPython is not defined in JupyterLab

12 answers

News


Wiki

Python OpenCV | cv2.putText () method

numpy.arctan2 () in Python

Python | os.path.realpath () method

Python OpenCV | cv2.circle () method

Python OpenCV cv2.cvtColor () method

Python - Move item to the end of the list

time.perf_counter () function in Python

Check if one list is a subset of another in Python

Python os.path.join () method