“Pretty” Continuous Integration for Python

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This is a slightly.. vain question, but BuildBot"s output isn"t particularly nice to look at..

For example, compared to..

..and others, BuildBot looks rather.. archaic

I"m currently playing with Hudson, but it is very Java-centric (although with this guide, I found it easier to setup than BuildBot, and produced more info)

Basically: is there any Continuous Integration systems aimed at python, that produce lots of shiny graphs and the likes?


Update: Since this time the Jenkins project has replaced Hudson as the community version of the package. The original authors have moved to this project as well. Jenkins is now a standard package on Ubuntu/Debian, RedHat/Fedora/CentOS, and others. The following update is still essentially correct. The starting point to do this with Jenkins is different.

Update: After trying a few alternatives, I think I"ll stick with Hudson. Integrity was nice and simple, but quite limited. I think Buildbot is better suited to having numerous build-slaves, rather than everything running on a single machine like I was using it.

Setting Hudson up for a Python project was pretty simple:

  • Download Hudson from http://hudson-ci.org/
  • Run it with java -jar hudson.war
  • Open the web interface on the default address of http://localhost:8080
  • Go to Manage Hudson, Plugins, click "Update" or similar
  • Install the Git plugin (I had to set the git path in the Hudson global preferences)
  • Create a new project, enter the repository, SCM polling intervals and so on
  • Install nosetests via easy_install if it"s not already
  • In the a build step, add nosetests --with-xunit --verbose
  • Check "Publish JUnit test result report" and set "Test report XMLs" to **/nosetests.xml

That"s all that"s required. You can setup email notifications, and the plugins are worth a look. A few I"m currently using for Python projects:

  • SLOCCount plugin to count lines of code (and graph it!) - you need to install sloccount separately
  • Violations to parse the PyLint output (you can setup warning thresholds, graph the number of violations over each build)
  • Cobertura can parse the coverage.py output. Nosetest can gather coverage while running your tests, using nosetests --with-coverage (this writes the output to **/coverage.xml)

"Pretty" Continuous Integration for Python log: Questions

log

Python"s equivalent of && (logical-and) in an if-statement

5 answers

delete By delete

Here"s my code:

def front_back(a, b):
  # +++your code here+++
  if len(a) % 2 == 0 && len(b) % 2 == 0:
    return a[:(len(a)/2)] + b[:(len(b)/2)] + a[(len(a)/2):] + b[(len(b)/2):] 
  else:
    #todo! Not yet done. :P
  return

I"m getting an error in the IF conditional.
What am I doing wrong?

934

Answer #1

You would want and instead of &&.

934

Answer #2

Python uses and and or conditionals.

i.e.

if foo == "abc" and bar == "bac" or zoo == "123":
  # do something

log

How do you get the logical xor of two variables in Python?

5 answers

Zach Hirsch By Zach Hirsch

How do you get the logical xor of two variables in Python?

For example, I have two variables that I expect to be strings. I want to test that only one of them contains a True value (is not None or the empty string):

str1 = raw_input("Enter string one:")
str2 = raw_input("Enter string two:")
if logical_xor(str1, str2):
    print "ok"
else:
    print "bad"

The ^ operator seems to be bitwise, and not defined on all objects:

>>> 1 ^ 1
0
>>> 2 ^ 1
3
>>> "abc" ^ ""
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for ^: "str" and "str"
794

Answer #1

If you"re already normalizing the inputs to booleans, then != is xor.

bool(a) != bool(b)

"Pretty" Continuous Integration for Python open: Questions

How can I open multiple files using "with open" in Python?

5 answers

I want to change a couple of files at one time, iff I can write to all of them. I"m wondering if I somehow can combine the multiple open calls with the with statement:

try:
  with open("a", "w") as a and open("b", "w") as b:
    do_something()
except IOError as e:
  print "Operation failed: %s" % e.strerror

If that"s not possible, what would an elegant solution to this problem look like?

788

Answer #1

As of Python 2.7 (or 3.1 respectively) you can write

with open("a", "w") as a, open("b", "w") as b:
    do_something()

In earlier versions of Python, you can sometimes use contextlib.nested() to nest context managers. This won"t work as expected for opening multiples files, though -- see the linked documentation for details.


In the rare case that you want to open a variable number of files all at the same time, you can use contextlib.ExitStack, starting from Python version 3.3:

with ExitStack() as stack:
    files = [stack.enter_context(open(fname)) for fname in filenames]
    # Do something with "files"

Most of the time you have a variable set of files, you likely want to open them one after the other, though.

open() in Python does not create a file if it doesn"t exist

5 answers

What is the best way to open a file as read/write if it exists, or if it does not, then create it and open it as read/write? From what I read, file = open("myfile.dat", "rw") should do this, right?

It is not working for me (Python 2.6.2) and I"m wondering if it is a version problem, or not supposed to work like that or what.

The bottom line is, I just need a solution for the problem. I am curious about the other stuff, but all I need is a nice way to do the opening part.

The enclosing directory was writeable by user and group, not other (I"m on a Linux system... so permissions 775 in other words), and the exact error was:

IOError: no such file or directory.

778

Answer #1

You should use open with the w+ mode:

file = open("myfile.dat", "w+")

Difference between modes a, a+, w, w+, and r+ in built-in open function?

5 answers

In the python built-in open function, what is the exact difference between the modes w, a, w+, a+, and r+?

In particular, the documentation implies that all of these will allow writing to the file, and says that it opens the files for "appending", "writing", and "updating" specifically, but does not define what these terms mean.

721

Answer #1

The opening modes are exactly the same as those for the C standard library function fopen().

The BSD fopen manpage defines them as follows:

 The argument mode points to a string beginning with one of the following
 sequences (Additional characters may follow these sequences.):

 ``r""   Open text file for reading.  The stream is positioned at the
         beginning of the file.

 ``r+""  Open for reading and writing.  The stream is positioned at the
         beginning of the file.

 ``w""   Truncate file to zero length or create text file for writing.
         The stream is positioned at the beginning of the file.

 ``w+""  Open for reading and writing.  The file is created if it does not
         exist, otherwise it is truncated.  The stream is positioned at
         the beginning of the file.

 ``a""   Open for writing.  The file is created if it does not exist.  The
         stream is positioned at the end of the file.  Subsequent writes
         to the file will always end up at the then current end of file,
         irrespective of any intervening fseek(3) or similar.

 ``a+""  Open for reading and writing.  The file is created if it does not
         exist.  The stream is positioned at the end of the file.  Subse-
         quent writes to the file will always end up at the then current
         end of file, irrespective of any intervening fseek(3) or similar.

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